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eco-boat

Definition of 'mooring'

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On ‎13‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 14:46, eco-boat said:

 

Now, can someone tell me what the definition of mooring is on a canal. Let's say the boat is stationary and out of the way, but is not tied to the bank, am I still moored?

Why would you do that? On most canals, if the boat is stationary and not causing an obstruction to moving boats it will be pretty close to the bank anyway, so might as well be tied with ropes i.e. moored. 

I'm sure Bizzard can come up with some whizzo force field that will hold your boat static inches away from the bank without any physical connection to the bank or bed, but if you do that I suspect CRT will regard you as 'moored' as much as a boat tied with ropes.

Edited by David Mack

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On ‎13‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 14:46, eco-boat said:

Apologies folks for not being complete in my questions. I had assumed that the rules would be the same across all rivers in the UK, but if they are different, it would be good to hear about the differences. As for my specific circumstances, I had originally plan on using the Thames and the grand union, but I've sort of relocated now (the blog is out of date) and now plan to use the Trent and Erewash and possibly the Soar.

Now, can someone tell me what the definition of mooring is on a canal. Let's say the boat is stationary and out of the way, but is not tied to the bank, am I still moored?

     Mark

Although the International Collision regs are not necessarily applicable in all circumstances on the inland waterways, it might be worth mentioning that in the circumstances you describe - ie stationary but not tied to the bank, under those rules you would be considered to be under way (not at anchor, made fast to the shore or aground) and if stationary you would be considered to be underway but not making way through the water.

Howard

Edited by howardang

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