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eco-boat

Definition of 'mooring'

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Hi Folks,

Can anyone tell me what the definition of 'mooring' is please.

I've been reading around permanent and short-term mooring, and have realised that there are time limits on canals and charges on rivers.

I'd like to understand the details of what can and can't be done. For example, if I find a quiet location on a wide river and I drop an anchor so that I am out of the way of traffic but still some way from the bank, am I moored? Would I need to pay the nightly mooring charge?

Regards,

      Mark

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2 minutes ago, eco-boat said:

..I drop an anchor so that I am out of the way of traffic but still some way from the bank, am I moored? Would I need to pay the nightly mooring charge?

Normally, on a river, the landowner of each bank also owns the bed to the centre of the river, as soon as you tie up to a tree, drop an anchor etc. you are mooring on private property.

Water is owned by no one so if you remain floating and unattached to any 'land' you are not moored and not subject to any charges.

Keep your engine running at tick over, or just sufficient to hold steady against the flow / current & you will be OK

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1 hour ago, eco-boat said:

Hi Folks,

Can anyone tell me what the definition of 'mooring' is please.

I've been reading around permanent and short-term mooring, and have realised that there are time limits on canals and charges on rivers.

I'd like to understand the details of what can and can't be done. For example, if I find a quiet location on a wide river and I drop an anchor so that I am out of the way of traffic but still some way from the bank, am I moored? Would I need to pay the nightly mooring charge?

Regards,

      Mark

You are going to struggle continuously cursing on the Thames especially when it goes into flood

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4 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

You are going to struggle continuously cursing on the Thames especially when it goes into flood

Why should he be " Cursing " whats gone wrong? :D

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1 minute ago, mrsmelly said:

Why should he be " Cursing " whats gone wrong? :D

He's experiencing the price of a pint in the Thames valley! 

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9 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

You are going to struggle continuously cursing on the Thames especially when it goes into flood

I have been Cursing on the Thames for 50 Years, I guess that is just the way I am?

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30 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

He's experiencing the price of a pint in the Thames valley! 

That's not even funny.

We have to endure that for two weeks next year!

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IIRC there is in the Thames bylaws a provision that you can anchor overnight out of the main navigation channel

  • Greenie 1

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On 12/11/2017 at 20:31, Loddon said:

IIRC there is in the Thames bylaws a provision that you can anchor overnight out of the main navigation channel

 

The bylaws may permit one to anchor overnight but do they permit one to do so without paying any charge levied by the riparian owner of the river bed to which you attach your anchor?

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Just now, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

The bylaws may permit one to anchor overnight but do they permit one to do so without paying any charge levied by the riparian owner of the river bed to which you attach your anchor?

Yes.

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2 hours ago, eco-boat said:

there are time limits on canals and charges on rivers.

Not necessarily .

On the River Trent if you have a valid river license you may moor overnight at C&RT moorings which are located near the locks - usually a 48 hrs limit is well signed. There isnt any need to moor elsewhere although there are, of course, marina moorings which require a fee. 

I have occasionally seen boats anchor on the non tidal Trent between locks and doubt whether anyone would ask for payment . 

I dont know the Thames but it seems there are some shorts stay moorings 

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/river-thames-bridges-locks-and-facilities-for-boaters#short-stay-moorings

 

.

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4 hours ago, eco-boat said:

Hi Folks,

Can anyone tell me what the definition of 'mooring' is please.

I've been reading around permanent and short-term mooring, and have realised that there are time limits on canals and charges on rivers.

I'd like to understand the details of what can and can't be done. For example, if I find a quiet location on a wide river and I drop an anchor so that I am out of the way of traffic but still some way from the bank, am I moored? Would I need to pay the nightly mooring charge?

Regards,

      Mark

Can anyone point out to me where the OP has mentioned the Thames ?

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Just now, Alan de Enfield said:

Can anyone point out to me where the OP has mentioned the Thames ?

If you read his blog that is where he intends to base himself

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1 minute ago, ditchcrawler said:

If you read his blog that is where he intends to base himself

So  before we can correctly answer a question we have to undertake investigations into the history of the poster and even read the posters blog.

Surely it would be more courteous for the questioner to at least put all necessary information, relevant to the question, within the body of the question.

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14 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

So  before we can correctly answer a question we have to undertake investigations into the history of the poster and even read the posters blog.

Surely it would be more courteous for the questioner to at least put all necessary information, relevant to the question, within the body of the question.

He mentions rivers in his original post, the Thames is a river.

Keith

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2 minutes ago, Steilsteven said:

He mentions rivers in his original post, the Thames is a river.

Keith

So is the Trent, the Avon, the Humber, the Severn and so on.

The Op actually says "if I find a quiet location on a wide river "  so how would anyone who does not slavishly 'stalk' the Op, and can only rely on his post on the forum, know his blog talks about the Thames as his base ?

  • Greenie 1

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I'm not so familiar with the Thames.  Is paying for temporary moorings a common thing there?  I've never paid to moor anywhere on the Severn, Trent, Avon, Weaver etc.

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1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

So is the Trent, the Avon, the Humber, the Severn and so on.

The Op actually says "if I find a quiet location on a wide river "  so how would anyone who does not slavishly 'stalk' the Op, and can only rely on his post on the forum, know his blog talks about the Thames as his base ?

I can't see why you're getting in such a state Allan, the question is general so answers will be about rivers that people are familiar with.

Anyway, in this part of the country THE river is how the Thames is always referred to ;)

Keith

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Apologies folks for not being complete in my questions. I had assumed that the rules would be the same across all rivers in the UK, but if they are different, it would be good to hear about the differences. As for my specific circumstances, I had originally plan on using the Thames and the grand union, but I've sort of relocated now (the blog is out of date) and now plan to use the Trent and Erewash and possibly the Soar.

Now, can someone tell me what the definition of mooring is on a canal. Let's say the boat is stationary and out of the way, but is not tied to the bank, am I still moored?

     Mark

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1 hour ago, eco-boat said:

.......now plan to use the Trent

There are a goodly number of pontoon visitors moorings on the Trent which are 2 day visitors moorings.

There are a number of Marinas and other private moorings on the Trent, these will charge visitors around £10 per night, or you can take a '12 month contract' for around £2k-£3k

The bed of the River is owned by the land owners of the banksides so any 'wild mooring' is trespass and / or subject to charges. The 'odd overnight' you would get away with but do not plan to make a habit of regularly (or extended) mooring on the River.

The River can quite easily get into flood - particularly between End September and End March  but has been known to have 'flash floods' in the middle of July. You would not want to be outside of a marina / proper mooring when that happens.

Just look how high the rubbish is in the trees - 6 foot + above the normal water level, and would your anchor hold you with 6 or 7 mile an hour flows and huge uprooted trees hitting your boat ?

The water level in our marina (Newark) regularly rises 5-6 feet but as we are on floating pontoons the mooring 'goes up' with the boat and the water level.

A couple of years ago we were trapped at Sawley (behind locked flood gates) for over 2 weeks due to the soar and Trent being in flood.

If you really plan to be a River dweller then you do need a proper mooring - it is a cost that actually will save you money

 

Edit to add :

The Soar is actually much more prone to flooding than the Trent - if someone washes their boat, or flushes their toilet the 'flood alarms go off' and the gates are locked. All movement is curtailed.

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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1 hour ago, eco-boat said:

Apologies folks for not being complete in my questions. I had assumed that the rules would be the same across all rivers in the UK, but if they are different, it would be good to hear about the differences. As for my specific circumstances, I had originally plan on using the Thames and the grand union, but I've sort of relocated now (the blog is out of date) and now plan to use the Trent and Erewash and possibly the Soar.

Now, can someone tell me what the definition of mooring is on a canal. Let's say the boat is stationary and out of the way, but is not tied to the bank, am I still moored?

     Mark

Yes but its not likely to be stationary because most canals have some flow caused by lock use and the wind will also move the boat. If you really are stationary you will almost certainly have attached yourself to the canal bed or a tree that is probably growing on CaRT land (In some cases CaRT do not own the offside bank but then it will have another owner who will have rights when you moor to their land).

Mooring on canals I would suggest relates to when you hold your boat stationary so in most cases CaRT rules will apply. (14 days unless specified otherwise). On rivers, CaRT controlled or otherwise in general the riparian owners will have rights when you attach yout boat to their land by whatever means, including with a mud weight or anchor). They may or may not impose a charge for this. In some cases the navigation authority may provide mooring subject to their terms and conditions that may or may not include fees and/or time limits.

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12 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

There are a goodly number of pontoon visitors moorings on the Trent which are 2 day visitors moorings.

 

I think 'a goodly number' is pushing it a bit!  But what I wanted to ask is:  have these reverted to 14 days now that it's winter, like those on the canals?

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27 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

I think 'a goodly number' is pushing it a bit!  But what I wanted to ask is:  have these reverted to 14 days now that it's winter, like those on the canals?

Surely a mooring every hour gives plenty of mooring opportunities.

eg from Nottingham to Lincoln :

C&RT Moorings

Meadow Lane

Holme Pierrepont

Stoke Bardolph

Gunthorpe

Hazelford

Farndon

Newark (C&RT Offices)

Newark Town Wall

Newark Nether Lock

Cromwell

Dunham Bridge

Torksey

Marinas :

Colwick Marina

Farndon Marina

Newark Marina

Kings Marina

Torksey Moorings

Burton Waters

Brayford Pool

Other Mooring Providers :

Hazelford (Pontoons)

Fiskerton (Pontoons)

North Muskham

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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29 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Surely a mooring every hour gives plenty of mooring opportunities.

eg from Nottingham to Lincoln :

C&RT Moorings

Meadow Lane

Holme Pierrepont

Stoke Bardolph

Gunthorpe

Hazelford

Farndon

Newark (C&RT Offices)

Newark Town Wall

Newark Nether Lock

Cromwell

Dunham Bridge

Torksey

Marinas :

Colwick Marina

Farndon Marina

Newark Marina

Kings Marina

Torksey Moorings

Burton Waters

Brayford Pool

Other Mooring Providers :

Hazelford (Pontoons)

Fiskerton (Pontoons)

North Muskham

 

Don't want to be picky, but you specifically said "pontoon visitors moorings on the Trent which are 2 day visitors moorings.", which eliminates all but 7 of the above.

Have Brayford Pool and Burton waters moved, then?

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