Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
rowland al

Charging of domestic batteries

Featured Posts

Just now, rowland al said:

You are probably right about that. But to confuse things, I did get something I didn't order. Maybe it's better?! :)

They might even confirm how it’s to be wired up if you ask them nicely ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, smileypete said:

 

Maybe this is why it's good idea to just pony up £100 or so and buy a Nasa BM1 or BM2, it greatly restricts choice, which can be a bad thing if there's too much of it... :unsure:

I will wait a few more days before I say 'told you so' to rowland....get a NASA. Not quite the time yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/11/2017 at 22:26, Dr Bob said:

I will wait a few more days before I say 'told you so' to rowland....get a NASA. Not quite the time yet. 

Me too.

I'm beginning to conclude those arguing in the other thread that a Smartgauge is easier to install than a shunt based ammeter are right, however!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/11/2017 at 23:51, Richard10002 said:

All of this is tending to confirm that I made the right decision to pony up the £100+ for a NASA BM2 :)

 

This would have been my preferred ammeter too (for the big display) but it doesn't work on 24v. So a BMV702 does the job but a torch and glasses are needed to see the display!

Richard, as an aside, was your Smartgauge one of those turning out to be wrongly calibrated when checked? I was compiling a list the other day and couldn't remember if yours was one known to be factory calibrated wrongly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

This would have been my preferred ammeter too (for the big display) but it doesn't work on 24v. So a BMV702 does the job but a torch and glasses are needed to see the display!

Richard, as an aside, was your Smartgauge one of those turning out to be wrongly calibrated when checked? I was compiling a list the other day and couldn't remember if yours was one known to be factory calibrated wrongly.

I have no idea whether it's correctly calibrated or not, and not really sure how to test. So I'm not on the list. 

When I got my Smartgauge the buttons didn't work properly. They replaced it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blast them with charge whenever possible, make it your over-arching long-term goal.

Be worryingly obsessive and fastidious, question your Methodology whenever possible.

Are you entirely convinced it's really all worth the bother though?

Batteries are deeply inefficient, stubborn bastards and that's all there is to know.

Providing you are mindful of the' financial cost and energy losses of storing energy, are parsimonious in your use and expectations, have a simple, correctly cabled and suitably sized battery bank/charging circuit, to include at least one (1), preferably two (2) independent/switchable man sized alternators and a built-in suitably rated diesel genny in case of Acts of God it's all acedemic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/11/2017 at 00:39, Richard10002 said:

I have no idea whether it's correctly calibrated or not, and not really sure how to test. So I'm not on the list. 

When I got my Smartgauge the buttons didn't work properly. They replaced it.

I bet its bloody miles out like mine, which would totally explain the total loss of your Trojans.

Do you have a digital multimeter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Dr Bob said:

I will wait a few more days before I say 'told you so' to rowland....get a NASA. Not quite the time yet. 

I would advise getting one of those clamp meters before getting an Ebay special, would still be quids in over a NASA.

 

7 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

Me too.

I'm beginning to conclude those arguing in the other thread that a Smartgauge is easier to install than a shunt based ammeter are right, however!!

Yes but it's not the shunt that's the problem here.

You could always charge to "100%" + N hours, where N is determined by a clamp meter. And an accurate voltmeter is always handy, and almost as easy to install as the SG. ;) But would N vary over time and temperature I wonder?

Edited by smileypete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, smileypete said:

I would advise getting one of those clamp meters before getting an Ebay special, would still be quids in over a NASA.

 

Yes but it's not the shunt that's the problem here.

You could always charge to "100%" + N hours, where N is determined by a clamp meter. And an accurate voltmeter is always handy, and almost as easy to install as the SG. ;) But would N vary over time and temperature I wonder?

How accurate are clamp meters for measuring DC current at 12v compared with using a shunt? Wouldn't they be affected by magnetic fields close by like from the alternator? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

Me too.

I'm beginning to conclude those arguing in the other thread that a Smartgauge is easier to install than a shunt based ammeter are right, however!!

That’s the point we were attempting to make. 

9 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

Just a shame they can't be relied upon to work properly, out of the box.

But they can. Do you need me to link to Merlin’s post again so you can read it properly?

2 hours ago, smileypete said:

but it's not the shunt that's the problem here.

He hasn’t installed it and had a Big Bang yet ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, rowland al said:

How accurate are clamp meters for measuring DC current at 12v compared with using a shunt? Wouldn't they be affected by magnetic fields close by like from the alternator? 

They’re reasonable. Usually within a couple of percent, and it’s trends that you’re looking for as much as absolute figures. The huge drawback of a hand held clamp meter though is that you have to dive down into the engine ‘ole (or wherever your batteries live) every time you want to read them. An ammeter/Ah counter/SmartGauge gives a constant readout at arm’s reach. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×