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Nick D

What sort of anchor?

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Up-Side-Down    25

There's some really great information for you in this thread Nick and it has certainly added considerably to my knowledge.

With regard to your specific question re establishing navigational depth of the Trent from Apex (or Trent Falls) to Top Gunness Wharf (Keadby) – this being the stretch dredged for ocean-going shipping – and the stretch of the Ouse, Apex to Goole – ditto – I recall that ships with a four metre draft are able to navigate at the top of a decent spring tide. You can check this by phoning Associated British Ports (ABP) at either Goole or Hull.

Shipping does go further upstream of Goole, to a wharf at Howden just downstream of the M62 flyover, but the deepest water that you are likely to encounter on a passage of, say Nottingham to York, is between Keadby and Goole.

The point made about river bed holes is a good one: deeper water, but only over a limited stretch of the bottom. However, for the swimmer, it is precisely these 'holes' that cause drownings as they set up a series of localised, powerful, rotating currents that suck debris (and the human body) downwards with unremitting force.

NB Whilst navigating ABP water (Gainsborough to Hook Railway Swing Bridge, above Goole) you are required to carry a minimum crew of two and a VHF radio – which of course requires a licensed operator (can be gained with a one-day course and is invaluable for boating this type of water).

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Alan de Enfield    1,068
40 minutes ago, Up-Side-Down said:

With regard to your specific question re establishing navigational depth of the Trent from Apex (or Trent Falls) to Top Gunness Wharf (Keadby) – this being the stretch dredged for ocean-going shipping – and the stretch of the Ouse, Apex to Goole – ditto – I recall that ships with a four metre draft are able to navigate at the top of a decent spring tide. You can check this by phoning Associated British Ports (ABP) at either Goole or Hull.

There are "proper" charts available for the Trent and show the depth above/below Chart datum.

All (the full set) available from APB

Example for keadby : Scroll down once you have opened the attachment.

 

Trent Keadby - Surveyed 23rd September 2015.pdf

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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Naughty Cal    751
1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

There are "proper" charts available for the Trent and show the depth above/below Chart datum.

All (the full set) available from APB

Example for keadby : Scroll down once you have opened the attachment.

 

Trent Keadby - Surveyed 23rd September 2015.pdf

The proper surveys stop at Keadby and Goole though. Full up to date list in the link below.

http://www.humber.com/Estuary_Information/Navigating_the_Estuary/Chart_Viewer/

3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Interestingly an anchor review appeared in MBM a while ago :

All tests giving a result out of a possible 5

Danforth                                                              Delta

Setting Ability =                1                                                              2

Holding in Loose soil =    5                                                              3

Holding in Hard soil =      2                                                              2             

Average across various ground = 2                                               3

Robustness =                     1                                                              5

 

Which is why I decided to ‘go for’ the Mantus, which gave the following results

Setting Ability =                5

Holding in Loose soil =    3                                                             

Holding in Hard soil =      5             

Average across various ground = 4                                          

Robustness =                     5

We only have 2 and a bit tonnes of boat hung off the end of our 10kg Delta though :)

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Alan de Enfield    1,068

We were moored up on that wall (behind the Lydia) last week - it was one of the worst nights moorings we have had for years - the tide was running at 5 knots + and the 'drop' (high tide to low tide) was about 9 feet so we were on watch all night adjusting lines.

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bizzard    874

The hullabaloo's ire boat struck a post on Breydon water chasing ''the fugative'' and was holed, The Coot club pirates in their salvage boat ''Death and Glory'' towed it into the shallows and saved the Hullabaloo's.  The boat was salvaged, and they all lived happily ever after. :mellow:

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rusty69    366
18 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

We were moored up on that wall (behind the Lydia) last week - it was one of the worst nights moorings we have had for years - the tide was running at 5 knots + and the 'drop' (high tide to low tide) was about 9 feet so we were on watch all night adjusting lines.

Makes Lowestoft look a more attractive option.

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bizzard    874
25 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

We were moored up on that wall (behind the Lydia) last week - it was one of the worst nights moorings we have had for years - the tide was running at 5 knots + and the 'drop' (high tide to low tide) was about 9 feet so we were on watch all night adjusting lines.

You should have used the old Yarmouth self adjusting ''Time knot''.

009.JPG

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bizzard    874
1 minute ago, rusty69 said:

Isn't there a snag with that:)

Loads. That's the idea, they gradually undo as the tide ebbs and saves your boat getting suspended in mid air from the harbour wall.

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Naughty Cal    751
2 hours ago, bizzard said:

You should have used the old Yarmouth self adjusting ''Time knot''.

009.JPG

Aka the holiday makers hitch.

2 hours ago, rusty69 said:

Makes Lowestoft look a more attractive option.

Part of the reason we always head into Lowestoft when we visit the Broads.

Quicker and nice pontoons to moor on at the yacht club.

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rusty69    366
52 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

Aka the holiday makers hitch.

Part of the reason we always head into Lowestoft when we visit the Broads.

Quicker and nice pontoons to moor on at the yacht club.

Same here.although further for us, Gt Yarmouth never seems very appealing.

Edited by rusty69

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WotEver    687
1 hour ago, rusty69 said:

Gt Yarmouth never seems very appealing.

So true, whatever you're doing (driving, boating, flying, jogging, walking...)

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Naughty Cal    751
1 hour ago, rusty69 said:

Same here.although further for us, Gt Yarmouth never seems very appealing.

It only takes us 15 minutes to get from the entrance to Yarmouth to the entrance at Lowestoft so it's a no brainer really. 

12 minutes ago, WotEver said:

So true, whatever you're doing (driving, boating, flying, jogging, walking...)

It has a good gun shop.

That's about it though!

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rusty69    366
2 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

it only takes us 15 minutes to get from the entrance to Yarmouth to the entrance at Lowestoft so it's a no brainer really

It can take us an hour and a half.Its not unknown for us to be going backwards at Scroby sands:)

  • Haha 1

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Hawker    0

This has been a very interesting discussion about anchors, chain & warp.

Recently, whilst preparing for a short trip, on our Nb on the Thames, (out at Bow Creek round the Isle of Dogs to go in at Limehouse, as part of the East London Waterways Festival, celebrating the reopening of the Carpenters Road Lock, Bow Back Rivers), I asked a fellow boater about how to make sure that the chain and warp did not get tangled once being thrown overboard. I had always had the chain in a bucket, with the warp attached to the chain going down the side and the chain coiled neatly until the free end at the top attaches to the anchor. The warp I coiled as neatly as possibly in a circle.

It was suggested to me that the safest way to coil the warp was in a figure of eight, as after the anchor and chain and are overboard, the warp would be less likely to get tangled. Does anyone have anything to add to this advice?

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rusty69    366
19 minutes ago, Hawker said:

This has been a very interesting discussion about anchors, chain & warp.

Recently, whilst preparing for a short trip, on our Nb on the Thames, (out at Bow Creek round the Isle of Dogs to go in at Limehouse, as part of the East London Waterways Festival, celebrating the reopening of the Carpenters Road Lock, Bow Back Rivers), I asked a fellow boater about how to make sure that the chain and warp did not get tangled once being thrown overboard. I had always had the chain in a bucket, with the warp attached to the chain going down the side and the chain coiled neatly until the free end at the top attaches to the anchor. The warp I coiled as neatly as possibly in a circle.

It was suggested to me that the safest way to coil the warp was in a figure of eight, as after the anchor and chain and are overboard, the warp would be less likely to get tangled. Does anyone have anything to add to this advice?

http://www.animatedknots.com/fig8flake/

 

For best results repeat '99' times:)

Probably more suited to boats with a large foredeck area.

Edited by rusty69

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Alan de Enfield    1,068
5 minutes ago, Hawker said:

..............once being thrown overboard. ..................

. Does anyone have anything to add to this advice?

An anchor should not be dropped overboard, let alone 'thrown' overboard, all that will happen is that you will end up with the anchor sat on the bottom with a pile of chain sat on top of it, this will stop the anchor flukes setting.

An anchor should be lowered over the side and as you drift back pay out more chain so that it is nicely paid out 'in a straight line', once you have let out sufficient make off the end and let the momentum set the anchor.

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bizzard    874
On 14/09/2017 at 08:37, Tony Brooks said:

And an "underwater see scope" so you can inspect the bottom and select a suitable anchor.

And if you spy something twitching down on the seabed it'll probably be a nervous wreck. :detective:

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