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tortuga guy    0

hello all,

i am in the process of buying a 46ft fully fitted second hand narrowboat and need to know the approximate weight of it , it has a draft of 2 feet 10mm base plate and never been overplated.

 i wondered if anyone here may be able to give me an estimate weight, thank you all , happy cruising.

Edited by tortuga guy
forgot a detail

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Alan de Enfield    1,027

Very roughly about 1 tonne per metre (or 330kg per foot if you prefer)

It depends if your tanks are full, the type of fit out, etc etc, but you would be 'on the safe side' at 1 tonne per metre.

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tortuga guy    0

Thank you very much Alan de Enfield,  

i am trying to fill in a boat transportation form,i  may have to move the boat from the reading area to the grand union but it involves navigating the thames for quite a stretch and i am not confident enough to do it so may move it by land,

thank you for your advice.

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ditchcrawler    379
15 minutes ago, tortuga guy said:

Thank you very much Alan de Enfield,  

i am trying to fill in a boat transportation form,i  may have to move the boat from the reading area to the grand union but it involves navigating the thames for quite a stretch and i am not confident enough to do it so may move it by land,

thank you for your advice.

Can't you find someone to lend a hand, it will be cheaper than road plus a lot more fun. Remember hires who are first time boaters do it quite regularly and there is little flow on the river at the moment.

 

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tortuga guy    0

THANK YOU DITCHCRAWLER, BUT I SIMPLY WONT RISK MY LIFE SAVINGS ON THE THAMES, ALSO WORRIED OF THE WASH CREATED BY BIG BOATS WHICH ARE COMMON ON THE THAMES. SO ALTHOUGH MORE EXPENSIVE I'D RATHER PLAY IT SAFER, THANKS FOR THE INPUT THOUGH

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RichM Donate to Canal World    0
27 minutes ago, tortuga guy said:

THANK YOU DITCHCRAWLER, BUT I SIMPLY WONT RISK MY LIFE SAVINGS ON THE THAMES, ALSO WORRIED OF THE WASH CREATED BY BIG BOATS WHICH ARE COMMON ON THE THAMES. SO ALTHOUGH MORE EXPENSIVE I'D RATHER PLAY IT SAFER, THANKS FOR THE INPUT THOUGH

The other option is to pay for someone with experience to travel the stretch with you. There's many people with a lot of experience and asking for this kind of assistance is not uncommon and no doubt cheaper. The other benefit of doing this is that it will be an opportunity to learn.  

Also, having a boat craned out and transported is not exactly risk free. Although uncommon, it has been known for damage to be caused during the process. I know someone who had their boat craned out on to a lorry and since then, many of her cupboards are out of alignment and don't close properly. 

RichM

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tortuga guy    0

thank you Rich M, 

cupboards are the least of my worries really but there must also be a few charlatans out there , would they be insured  ? my policy does not cover the thames i dont think, it is a category D vessel after all, maybe i'm just been over cautious but the idea of loosing the boat on our first long cruise shivers me timbers to be honest , i will for sure investigate the option though, thank you

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Neil2    233

We're 45 foot and I've calculated somewhere between 11 and 13 tonnes.

Presumably you are trying to avoid the tidal Thames?  If you are trying to access the Northern GU via the South Oxford absolutely no reason not to take it up the Thames from Reading it's a fairly benign stretch at this time of year and there really isn't any danger from larger boats oncoming or passing.  We met a couple in a little Sea Otter a few years ago at Caversham lock it was their first ever trip on a narrowboat.  

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tortuga guy    0

thank you neil2, i'm beginning to change my mind slightly, i will look at the map again, i thought i would have to take it east all the way to Brentford, join the brent river then the G.U , never thought of the oxford canal, and the thames is calmer towards oxford, will give it some serious thought now , that's great stuff Neil2 , thanks again

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ditchcrawler    379

Even going down stream to Brentford the only tidal bit is between Tedington and Brentford and the chances of seeing a big boat going fast on that section is next to nil. From where you are to Tedington is very similar and all covered by a speed limit so no sinking washes.

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Heffalump    43

The Thames in that area is a lovely bit of river.  I used to take first-time hirers out and set them on their way from Radcot. 

Plus the South Oxford canal is gorgeous ;)

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mrsmelly Contributor    1,146
5 minutes ago, Heffalump said:

The Thames in that area is a lovely bit of river.  I used to take first-time hirers out and set them on their way from Radcot. 

Plus the South Oxford canal is gorgeous ;)

And whats even better you can come and see me :D

  • Haha 1

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2 hours ago, tortuga guy said:

hello all,

i am in the process of buying a 46ft fully fitted second hand narrowboat and need to know the approximate weight of it , it has a draft of 2 feet 10mm base plate and never been overplated.

 i wondered if anyone here may be able to give me an estimate weight, thank you all , happy cruising.

Getting back on topic, a cuboid of water 46ft x 2ft x 7ft is the maximum a boat of your dimensions can displace.

This is approximately 18 cubic metres so the maximum possible weight of your boat is 18 tonnes. 

However, given your boat probably tapers in at each end and the waterline length is probably a little less than 46ft, I'd estimate you boat weighs around 15 tonnes or possibly a little less. 

  • Greenie 1

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1 minute ago, NB Lola said:

We are 57ft, cruiser stern and weigh in at 20 tons - before I board!!

 

It makes no difference what sort of stern, what the baseplate is made on, or who is on board.

The ONLY thing that matters when calculating the weight is the volume of water physically displaced. 

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NB Lola Donate to Canal World    43
5 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

It makes no difference what sort of stern, what the baseplate is made on, or who is on board.

The ONLY thing that matters when calculating the weight is the volume of water physically displaced. 

I agree, merely giving a large ball park.  But, I thank you for your moderation, fancy a job?

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OldGoat    138

I am a Thames resident boater and I recall the first time(s) we attempted any Thames transit with huge trepidation - and  we started with a transit from Limehouse to Teddington.  After completion we wondered what all the fuss was about!

PROVIDED ALWAYS that you venture out onto the tidal part -

  • at the state of the tide that the lock keeper  recommends is the optimum tide and condition
  • For you, take a  more experienced boater with you
  • an anchor wit long chain and 'warp'
  • Do your preparation

The non tidal part from Reading to Teddington is more like a very big canal.

  • The locks look scary but few are as deep as the deepest GU lock
  • Depending on when you go they may be manned - so you'll get some help

The only time the Thames can be scary is when the River is in flood -'red boards' - and it's tossing it down and blowing a gale.

The frightening part is ONLY of you go the wrong way (downstream to Limehouse at the wrong state of the tide and in the tourist season) 

If you have general common sense you should have no problem. A sideways suggestion is how about finding someone to tow you (tug boat) fro Teddington to Brentford if you' re4ally got damp underwear....

 

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Neil2    233

It all depends how much time you have and how far down the GU you have to go, but the trip from Reading up the Oxford to join the GU at Napton is one of the most pleasant stretches on the entire network (and I'm a Northerner) it's a shame to miss the opportunity to do it.  I'd even have a look at whether it's possibly to do it in stages.  You will save a lot of money and gain a lot of experience.

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Jess--    62

as others have said... the thames down to teddington is nothing to be concerned with if there is little flow (it's also nice and wide so you can gain experience of how your boat handles)

I did it for the first time a few months ago and was pleasantly surprised with how calm everything was.

after playing all the way from dukes cut (oxford) down to teddington the stretch from teddington down to brentford was fun (we clocked 6mph just going with the flow towards the end).

I enjoyed it so much I'm doing it again next month (dukes cut - down to teddington and then back up to lechlade before coming back off at dukes cut

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10 minutes ago, Jess-- said:

as others have said... the thames down to teddington is nothing to be concerned with if there is little flow (it's also nice and wide so you can gain experience of how your boat handles)

I did it for the first time a few months ago and was pleasantly surprised with how calm everything was.

after playing all the way from dukes cut (oxford) down to teddington the stretch from teddington down to brentford was fun (we clocked 6mph just going with the flow towards the end).

I enjoyed it so much I'm doing it again next month (dukes cut - down to teddington and then back up to lechlade before coming back off at dukes cut

 

You really MUST do Sheepwash Channel. IS the best bit of the whole Oxford! 

Go past the chained up railway engine turntable combined with bridge over the cut, then do the two miles or so of moody cut behind all the posh houses in Jerico... so very atmospheric, I lurve it...

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alan_fincher    1,822
17 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

Go past the chained up railway engine turntable combined with bridge over the cut, then do the two miles or so of moody cut behind all the posh houses in Jerico... so very atmospheric, I lurve it...

I think you railway history might be a bit jumbled here!

It could only swing one way, and was not capable of 180 degree rotation, surely?

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Well I might be wrong but I'm fairly sure the little notice on the fence by the railway society says it is a turntable as well a s a swing bridge.

Or maybe there is a turntable adjacent to the swing bridge...

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