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Jon57

Safe passing distance for towpath users

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Jess--    62
13 minutes ago, cuthound said:

Not road tax, but given their potential to damage third parties, cycles should in my opinion carry compulsory registration plates and insurance.

make the registration plates 4 feet x 2 feet (to be shown front and rear)....

that should slow them down a bit (even if only through wind resistance) ;)

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rusty69    279

I reckon people should have compulsory insurance to cover all kinds of events. Including operating a shopping trolley, flying a kite, owning a dog to name a few. 

Edited by rusty69

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Hudds Lad    14
45 minutes ago, cuthound said:

Not road tax, but given their potential to damage third parties, cycles should in much in ion carry compulsory registration plates and insurance.

I kind of agree with that, but at what age does that start? And who polices/enforces it?

Personally, as a British Cycling member, third party liability insurance is part and parcel of my membership

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zenataomm    451

On the continent I have seen in some countries a small enamelled badge with a serial number and a date.  Supplied at a cost to the bike owner it confirms insurance and registration. In Spain they were red and on the back mudguard.  They could be issued by The Post Office, bike shops and on-line.

At what age is not an issue. A child's parent or guardian would be responsible, and held to account for their off-spring's behaviour and actions.

Anyone whose job description encompasses maintaining law/rules/by-laws in the public domain could enforce, be they police, park attendants, hobby bobbies, water bailiffs, busy bodies or daleks.  Eventually peer group pressure would take effect and it would be self governing.

Those flouting the rules would be crushed along with their bike.

  • Happy 1

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Hudds Lad    14
7 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

On the continent I have seen in some countries a small enamelled badge with a serial number and a date.  Supplied at a cost to the bike owner it confirms insurance and registration. In Spain they were red and on the back mudguard.  They could be issued by The Post Office, bike shops and on-line.

At what age is not an issue. A child's parent or guardian would be responsible, and held to account for their off-spring's behaviour and actions.

Anyone whose job description encompasses maintaining law/rules/by-laws in the public domain could enforce, be they police, park attendants, hobby bobbies, water bailiffs, busy bodies or daleks.  Eventually peer group pressure would take effect and it would be self governing.

Those flouting the rules would be crushed along with their bike.

Set it up my friend, i'll buy into it, as long as its not so prohibitively expensive that kids can't enjoy cycling and that a goodly percentage of the cost is plowed back into infrastructure and not just another piggy bank for whatever government to raid when they see fit.

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Jerra    619
12 hours ago, zenataomm said:

On the continent I have seen in some countries a small enamelled badge with a serial number and a date.  Supplied at a cost to the bike owner it confirms insurance and registration. In Spain they were red and on the back mudguard.  They could be issued by The Post Office, bike shops and on-line.

Having read some reports where riders (I won't honour them with the title cyclist) haven't stopped they would need to be readable from a couple of yards away at least.  IMO anyway.

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Murflynn    437
21 hours ago, zenataomm said:

 

Those flouting the rules would be crushed along with their bike.

now that, I like :cheers:

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Tigerr    114

Evidence based policy is the way to go. Simply collate the A&E data for cyclist injury to pedestrians and use that to establish the insurance/licence rates. Based on the comments of internet fora there are clearly thousands of injured pedestrians...

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Murflynn    437
1 hour ago, Tigerr said:

Evidence based policy is the way to go. Simply collate the A&E data for cyclist injury to pedestrians and use that to establish the insurance/licence rates. Based on the comments of internet fora there are clearly thousands of injured pedestrians...

yes but .................  the NHS will claim it doesn't have the funds for that type of research.  It would probably require a whole new department of civil servants.

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reg    57
On 07/06/2017 at 08:28, Murflynn said:

........ 

cyclists can do whatever they like and are untouchable, 'cos they think the sun shines out of their proverbial.

That would certainly solve the early morning soggy saddle problem

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mrsmelly Contributor    1,170
On ‎07‎/‎06‎/‎2017 at 10:52, Hudds Lad said:

I kind of agree with that, but at what age does that start? And who polices/enforces it?

Personally, as a British Cycling member, third party liability insurance is part and parcel of my membership

I would hope all sensible cyclists have such insurance and bet it costs peanuts. Sensible dog owners insure their dogs to cover damage to persons/property made by the said dog that is also not expensive. I would suggest the age of criminal responsibility as a good place to start.

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Hudds Lad    14
9 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

I would hope all sensible cyclists have such insurance and bet it costs peanuts.

£37 per year, nothing really for peace of mind, I've saved that already with the 10% discount I get at Halfords as part of the membership package ;)

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bastion    5

But without any easily read identification plate how would an injured party be able to claim on insurance 

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mrsmelly Contributor    1,170
4 minutes ago, bastion said:

But without any easily read identification plate how would an injured party be able to claim on insurance 

Obviously cyclists being sensible law abiding citizens will always stop and sort it out :lol:

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bastion    5
Just now, mrsmelly said:

Obviously cyclists being sensible law abiding citizens will always stop and sort it out :lol:

No hit and run then

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mrsmelly Contributor    1,170
1 minute ago, bastion said:

No hit and run then

You have a pm

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cuthound Contributor    330
2 hours ago, bastion said:

No hit and run then

Not unless they damage their bike and make it un-rideable, usually they hit you and cycle off. :P

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Heartland    18

Some nineteen years ago Waterways World published a piece on towpath cycling (May 1998)

The article noted that towpath cycling had become an emotive issue following the imposition by British Waterways of paid cyling licenses on the Kennet & Avon Canal.

In November 1997 the IWA produced their draft Towing Path policy.

In the IWA coverage of cycling on towpaths it included the following

(1) Towpaths should not be designated part of a formal cycle route unless they are at least five metres wide

(2) The IWA would oppose any action to establish a "universal right to cycle"

(3) Competitions, races and other large group cycling activities are not appropriate on towpaths

(4) Cyclists must be prepared to dismount when passing other towpath users

(5) The need for cycle routes to meet the requirements of the Road Traffic Regulations Act (1997) will place increasing pressure for new or continuing use of towpaths or cycleways.

In December 1997 BW joined with the cycling organisation CTC and issued a joint statement asking for Government recognition, through funding, for the use of towpaths within "green transport" and making a commitment to work together to develop the transport potential of the towpath network. Within the statement was the commiitment to engage local authority assistance.

There followed a war of words where the IWA opposed any major extension pf cycling  on towpaths as an alternative to roads for cycling commuters.

A compromise between the IWA and BW was achieved in March 1998 when it was decided

(a) the proposals for increased cycling on towpaths will be developed for individual sections according to local needs

(b) a full local consultation would be made on proposals to convert sections of towpaths to cycle routes

(c) development proposals will protect the built heritage and natural environment of the waterway, the interest of navigation and safety and convenience of existing users

(d) cycling will be expected to make a contribution to the cost of maintenance and development of towpaths.

 

It is perhaps a salutary observation that some cyclists have abused these principals laid out. It is also true that the CRT do not, or cannot, enforce their own more recent towpath code. The development, or non development, of towpaths to allow cycling  remains a contentious issue. There is so much opportunity for a fair provision of cycling and in some instances the provision of cycling routes helps to keep waterways open and with the Lichfield & Hatherton Trust such facilities are a means for restoration to proceed.

Regulation appears to be the way forward and yet perhaps asking to CRT to act on this is perhaps yet another oxymoron.

  

 

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manxmike    38

Here on the Isle of Man we have a thing called the TT. Twice a year 37.75 miles of public roads are closed to the public for periods of the day to allow practicing and then racing, high powered motorcycles hurtle round at speeds over 200 mph at times. I Marshal the events and it's GREAT!!

During this time, especially for the TT in June the mountain section of the course (unrestricted speed - yes, I do mean unrestricted) is made one way in the direction racing takes place so the fans can set out to discover that they and their bikes are not professional racers and just how hard walls and the tarmac are when you hit them at 150 mph.

Sadly during this period the lycra clad loons exercise their "right" to ride their bicycles along this route - there's nothing more fun and amusing than coming around a corner at 120 mph to find four cyclists abreast across the road in front of you. The cyclists also find it amusing and cheerfully call out happy, friendly greetings whilst waving to you (at least I think that's what they were doing).

This year for the Manx Grand Prix the Isle of Man Government and the Police have very very sensibly banned cyclists from the mountain section. Whilst I realise that towpaths are a different kettle of fish maybe the occasional set of spikes across the route .....

Easily avoidable by pedestrians, but cyclists would have to dismount, carry their bikes over the obstruction, then set off again making it difficult for them to reach mach 2, never mind the usual mach 3.

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