Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
mizpah2

wide beam

Featured Posts

our boat is 12ft wide so to get us through bridges etc i cut a piece of 1" x 1/4 ally bar the length of which is from the bottom of the tiller to just short of the deck ( so when not needed it hangs out of the way ) it has a leather loop to go around the tiller and the other end is wrapped with non slip tape .i can now stand at the side of the rear deck and judge the gaps easier than before .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boat is 14 feet wide, you soon get used to positioning it for approaches to locks etc by looking over the roof, down the centreline and watching the 'approach angle' such that both sides of the lock approach at the same angle.

 

Our other boat is 23 foot beam - now that is interesting trying to get it onto a pontoon below gunnel height when its 20 foot to one side of you, and 5 feet below you. (wheel on Port side).

 

Practice - its a lot easier than faffing about with bits of ali bar.

 

Its a bit like those 'sissy buttons' (Bow thrusters) some people get so used to using them that the day they break, or the battery is flat, they havn't got a hope of driving their boat safely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saying that it is better to practice and become proficient, than rely on gimmicks which will let you down one day.

 

Once you have mastered the 'art' then play with your toys all you want, but go back on 'occasional refreshers'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the reply ! you obviously do not mind upsetting people !

 

But Alan is quite right. I don't know if you drive a car, but what do drivers have to do when they are parking or putting their car into their garage? They don't have to resort to weird devices. If you learn to steer properly from the outset you would not need them, but if you use them from the word go then you are never going to learn to steer confidently and competently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at my response, it is rather brusque. It is not meant as a put-down and your idea is quite clever, but it is far better to learn to steer rather than rely on such devices.

Edited by Tam & Di

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fully agree with Alan & Tam's comments.

 

Ours is only 11ft wide. We had a bow thruster when we first started out, we couldn't get in or out of the marina without it; well that was till we went through Braunston tunnel the first time and broke it from over use. We went through Blisworth tunnel the following day without a problem and haven't bothered to even look at what it would take to repair it and that was 2+ years ago.

 

The only gadget we have for steering is a short step for me to stand on when in control of the tiller so I can see over the roof (I'm a bit of a short arse)

 

Take it slow and practice, you'll soon get there and your confidence will grow each trip boat.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take it slow and practice, you'll soon get there and your confidence will grow each trip boat.gif

 

Assuming also that you are mostly on canals built for boats some 14' wide you have a bit more than 12" inches on either side when entering a lock. Bridgeholes are generally about 16' so you have so you have an enormous gap on either side of you there - there is a saying "a miss is as good as a mile" smile.png

 

Bettie is right that you don't want to go hell for leather at it, but don't go too slowly either as you can lose control or the wind can catch you. People with n/b experience who come on our barge handling training courses sometimes say to me that they go out of gear and drift into locks, saying that if they hit something it will only be gentle. I have to point out to them that it is not a case of "if", it is "when", as you only have control when the engine is in gear and you are moving at least at a moderate speed.

 

Tam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fully agree with Alan & Tam's comments.

 

Ours is only 11ft wide. We had a bow thruster when we first started out, we couldn't get in or out of the marina without it; well that was till we went through Braunston tunnel the first time and broke it from over use. We went through Blisworth tunnel the following day without a problem and haven't bothered to even look at what it would take to repair it and that was 2+ years ago.

 

The only gadget we have for steering is a short step for me to stand on when in control of the tiller so I can see over the roof (I'm a bit of a short arse)

 

Take it slow and practice, you'll soon get there and your confidence will grow each trip boat.gif

don't own up to using " gadgets " someone will tell you off , I think I've some platform shoes in the attic from the 70's, are you a size 8 ? I am happy with my stick !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

But Alan is quite right. I don't know if you drive a car, but what do drivers have to do when they are parking or putting their car into their garage? They don't have to resort to weird devices. If you learn to steer properly from the outset you would not need them, but if you use them from the word go then you are never going to learn to steer confidently and competently.

 

I drive a car , ride a motorcycle , fly an aircraft , without gadgets " weird devices " , my stick just makes going through narrows while sailing my boat easier for me . ( can I go back to the virtual pub now and be unlocked ? )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to race a sailing dinghy and when "hiking out" a tiller extension was needed.

 

I've often wondered whether one may be of use on a canal boat, wide or narrow.

 

 

tillerkarl400.jpg

 

The example here is on a small yacht rather than a dinghy.

 

I won't fit one to our boat as it is not really necessary except it may occasionally be of use when seated thus:

 

 

 

Just musing.

Edited by Ray T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to race a sailing dinghy and when "hiking out" a tiller extension was needed.

 

I've often wondered whether one may be of use on a canal boat, wide or narrow.

 

 

tillerkarl400.jpg

 

 

I don't think this was how the OP's device was to be used. If I understand it correctly it is so he can stand on one side of his 12' beam boat to view along the edge as he enters narrow sections such as bridges and locks. I guess it would put his engine controls out of reach but he does not mention that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

our boat is 12ft wide so to get us through bridges etc i cut a piece of 1" x 1/4 ally bar the length of which is from the bottom of the tiller to just short of the deck ( so when not needed it hangs out of the way ) it has a leather loop to go around the tiller and the other end is wrapped with non slip tape .i can now stand at the side of the rear deck and judge the gaps easier than before .

I was thinking about this a while back any chance of a picture, Mizpah?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am gutted there goes my big money maker , someone got there first and posher ! we are moving the boat on thursday to get our bottom painted ! if i can take a piccy I will , then post it .


 

I don't think this was how the OP's device was to be used. If I understand it correctly it is so he can stand on one side of his 12' beam boat to view along the edge as he enters narrow sections such as bridges and locks. I guess it would put his engine controls out of reach but he does not mention that.

 

I always go to port were the controls are behind me within reach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a narrowboat with a hinged brass tiller bar to achieve what Ray T wants. A prettier version of the yacht tiller extension.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a narrowboat with a hinged brass tiller bar to achieve what Ray T wants. A prettier version of the yacht tiller extension.

 

I hanker not after either a tiller extension or a hinged tiller

 

e.g.

 

 

15585_450_450.jpg

I was just musing as to whether one my be of occasional use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know mine's not a widebeam, but presumably it's the same principle for a narrow boat and narrow bridges - why not just line the middle up with the middle, rather than worry about looking down the sides?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know mine's not a widebeam, but presumably it's the same principle for a narrow boat and narrow bridges - why not just line the middle up with the middle, rather than worry about looking down the sides?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know mine's not a widebeam, but presumably it's the same principle for a narrow boat and narrow bridges - why not just line the middle up with the middle, rather than worry about looking down the sides?

 

Mine are widebeams and that's what I do - I don't see why its a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tripboat I skipper is a widebeam, but I can't do that as the wheelhouse is off to one side at the front....

 

I end up going into the lock hanging out of the window, looking backwards and steering the stern in. Oh, wheel steering too, just for a complete brain melt!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know mine's not a widebeam, but presumably it's the same principle for a narrow boat and narrow bridges - why not just line the middle up with the middle, rather than worry about looking down the sides?

 

Depends on the bridge, and how familiar you are with it.

 

I steer a 10' 6" beam boat on the Edinbugh and Glasgow Union canal. The "new" bridges were built to 12' 6", but the wooden fendering was neglected from the calculations, so most are just under 12' wide. Added to which, the towpath is straight edged for 2 metres on each side and 2 metres wide under the bridge. The bridge tops are straight, so judging centre plus 2 metres plus about 3" to an accuracy of 9", assuming an absolutely perfect line, which is seldom the case, is a lot harder than taking a quick glance along the side of the boat. This gives information on position and line more accurately than trying to judge it from the centre or side of the back deck.

 

The old bridges are a lot easier; just go under the second stone from the keystone away from the towpath! (apart from Bridge 1, when it's the join between fourth and fifth)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like it on the L and L where you get a white mark in the centre of the navigation channel (which is not the same as the centre of the arch)

 

DSC01288_1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine is 13 feet wide, it have a steering wheel, I know it is cheeting, but the tiller would just stick out the genny room door, between the port and starboard toilets, and view forward it blocked by the staircase going from the restaurant to the deck.

 

The wheel on the other hand is located in the middle of the wheel house, having good over view of forward deck, perfect when going into the locks up and down in the canal, we use what we have to use to do the job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only wide beam I helmed regularly had a central wheel. It meant that you can stand still dead central on the stern which in someway makes it easier to gauge where everything is rather than moving about with a tiller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×