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DomX

'Renting' out your narrowboat to friends/family.

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Having told our friends and family that we're buying a narrowboat, we've had 3 requests to 'rent' it already! I'm sure this isn't uncommon, but it did get us thinking about the pros and cons of doing this.

 

Firstly, we're buying the boat because we love the whole canal life and have enjoyed renting in the past. It is first and foremost our toy, so to speak and we're not looking to get into the rental business. That said, I'm not averse to the idea of letting a close friend or trusted family member spend a week on the boat in return for a contribution towards the running costs. Is this something that people do? Are there any specific insurance requirements? What are the pitfalls in doing this?

 

Thanks,

Dom.

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Having told our friends and family that we're buying a narrowboat, we've had 3 requests to 'rent' it already! I'm sure this isn't uncommon, but it did get us thinking about the pros and cons of doing this.

 

Firstly, we're buying the boat because we love the whole canal life and have enjoyed renting in the past. It is first and foremost our toy, so to speak and we're not looking to get into the rental business. That said, I'm not averse to the idea of letting a close friend or trusted family member spend a week on the boat in return for a contribution towards the running costs. Is this something that people do? Are there any specific insurance requirements? What are the pitfalls in doing this?

 

Thanks,

Dom.

 

People do this pretty often. Just check your insurance policy allows for it - some require to be informed of who is using the boat. If they just cover incidental costs such as diesel used it is accepted that you are not renting along with all the extra regs, and rules that entails.

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Dom,

 

Of course you can (subject to Martin's observation above)

 

And that's an honourable suggestion of yours.

 

All I would say is that do you recall the very first time you rented a narrowboat, and the bangs and scrapes you encountered, (of your learning process, and of other hireboaters)?

 

Well, that's not unusual - - you have to be comfortable that the same will, in all likelihood, happen to your pride-n-joy - - and it must not damage your relationships

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Tread carefully!!! We had every intention of doing this, last week a very close friend asked to use our boat for a weekend, he had rented previously on 4 occasions and I agreed. I went with him for the first hour and first lock.........."OH MY GOD" never again, I never slept the entire weekend!!! It doesn't matter how well you know someone or trust them.......no one will ever treet your baby with the same care and love that you do!!!

Only my experience but hope it helps.

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Dom,

 

Of course you can (subject to Martin's observation above)

 

And that's an honourable suggestion of yours.

 

All I would say is that do you recall the very first time you rented a narrowboat, and the bangs and scrapes you encountered, (of your learning process, and of other hireboaters)?

 

Well, that's not unusual - - you have to be comfortable that the same will, in all likelihood, happen to your pride-n-joy - - and it must not damage your relationships

 

I was trying to come up with an eloquent way of saying this but couldn't - could only think of -

 

'Oh and don't get pissed off with them if they sink it...'

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I think you need a commercial licence if you are hiring your boat out even if it is to friends

 

If hiring yes - if loaning no.

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When we bought our new boat, part of the deal between us was that we would never lend it to any friends or family. I think that is a good policy!

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When we bought our new boat, part of the deal between us was that we would never lend it to any friends or family. I think that is a good policy!

 

I have friends along on at least half the occasions I use the boat, but I am always there too.

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It depends how much you trust your friends / family.

 

We lent our boat (home) to our son and his friends for a week the year before last and got it back cleaner and tidier than when they took it. We'd checked with our insurance company first and they were fine with loaning.

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We have also lent our boat out to friends and family. The insurance only states the crew must be competant and there is no reward (fee) from it. If ever we want our cupboards cleaned and brass polished we offer the boat to Janet S

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Our boat insurers require to be informed of any changes to those in charge of the boat, and whilst the insurance is in our names we have name our three kids (all over 22 now)as named persons. However, todate the kids have now been interersted in taking her out on their own. We are confident that they are more than capable.

 

We do invite friends and family to join us for the day or weekend whilst we are on board.

 

Boat currently being repainted so upon delivery we be treating her with cotton wool (LOL)... well for the first few trips

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It depends how much you trust your friends / family.

 

Trouble is that if you lend it to a competent friend / family member, you can then come under pressure from incompetent ones. It may not be best for family relations to explain why you are prepared to lend it to someone else, but not to YOU! A blanket policy is less offensive!

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We have also lent our boat out to friends and family. The insurance only states the crew must be competant and there is no reward (fee) from it. If ever we want our cupboards cleaned and brass polished we offer the boat to Janet S

Mrs T writes:

We loan our boat to a couple (and their 4 dogs) on a regular basis as they are very competent and respectful of our property. As with cheshire-rose, they are covered on our policy providing Ray has satisfied himself they are competent and he has informed the insurer of their experience (Stuart handles CF better than I can !). We contact our insurer each time they are on board, together with details of their intended journey. Our friends also help if we need to move her to our preferred yard (5 hour trip) so get more practice.

 

 

As for family, unless they have days out with Ray to get used to her quirks, the answer is No to borrowing. Funny how family can't be bothered to find the odd day............

 

 

My own recommendation to the OP is unless they are prepared to learn about your boat and demonstrate over a period of time that they can handle her - FORGET IT.

 

 

Mrs T

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Trouble is that if you lend it to a competent friend / family member, you can then come under pressure from incompetent ones. It may not be best for family relations to explain why you are prepared to lend it to someone else, but not to YOU! A blanket policy is less offensive!

I agree with you. I just tell people/friends/family that I would love to lend my boat to them but my evil insurance won't let me. Problem solved.

:)

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It depends how much you trust your friends / family.

 

We lent our boat (home) to our son and his friends for a week the year before last and got it back cleaner and tidier than when they took it. We'd checked with our insurance company first and they were fine with loaning.

But Matty is an exceptional lad though so you cannot use him as a norm

 

I would not lend my wife to any body. Why should I lend my boat?

 

But since we live on our boat, the question would never arise. Ok, guests are bad enough. Think of all the tidying you have to go through to make the guest cabin into a skeeping area instead of a junk room!

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Hi,

 

Don't do it - I owed a friend a favour and back in 1989 we let him and his family have a weeks holiday it, he invited his friends along for odd days and it took a fair bit of tidying (by us) at the end and my lasting impression is lots of flies buzzing round when they left.

 

Have kept the boat for personal use ever since.

 

Since that time boats and equipment have become a lot more complicated and it's not worth the problems letting others use it .............now about that trail of loo blue or green across the floor - 'I told you to carry the cassette flat when carrying it through the boat'......

 

Leo.

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for us the boot is on the other foot. Before we owned a boat we moved a couple of boats for friends and I am honoured that they trusted us with their boats.

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But Matty is an exceptional lad though so you cannot use him as a norm

 

I would not lend my wife to any body. Why should I lend my boat?

 

But since we live on our boat, the question would never arise. Ok, guests are bad enough. Think of all the tidying you have to go through to make the guest cabin into a skeeping area instead of a junk room!

 

Ahah!

 

But there may be some (and I couldn't possibly suggest that it was me) - who may be delighted to lend their partner, but NOT their boat!

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I let my son and a group of his fireids have my boat for the week end last month. They are all in their twenties and had a fantastic time. The boat was unharmed and they now all love boating so it is a great way to introduce new people to the wonders of our canals, especially the next generation.

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Guest wanted

I love my boat but essentially it's an insured lump of metal that I hope will bring joy to as many of my friends and family as possible!

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"Any time you want to use my boat you're more than welcome..."

 

"Errr...No...Thanks for the offer Carl but...Err...No."

 

Buy a wooden boat and it's all yours.

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"Any time you want to use my boat you're more than welcome..."

 

"Errr...No...Thanks for the offer Carl but...Err...No."

 

Buy a wooden boat and it's all yours.

 

"Here's the keys for the engine... and here's the nappies to stuff in any leaks... and here's a bucket of ash to chuck overboard if it leaks... and here's the spare bilge pump... make sure you check the float switches for Lego bricks so the bilge pump works...."

 

"Oh, I've changed my mind!"

 

:P

 

(You're a braver man than I!)

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We have lent Theodora to JanetS who took her away up the Erewash for a week in winter and treated her well. Tow other sets of friends have borrowed her on various occasions. All of these have made an entirely voluntary donation to our church funds (cheque made out to the church and not to us.)

 

They all said that they had a good time and brought her back undamaged on each occasion. As has been said, it depends on your attitude to your possessions. I suspect it can be a bit of a strain for those borrowing. Looking after a friend's PnJ is much more stressful than a hire boat. I know because I borrowed my sister's boat on two or three occasions.

 

Nick

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There are a couple of forum members with +60 foot boats that we've offered an exchange to - they borrow our boat and visit parts of the system they can't reach on their boat, in exchange we borrow their boat and invite a few friends / family because we'll have the accommodation on theirs that we don't have on ours,

 

Our boat is our home but there's no point being too precious about it. I'm incredibly thankful that we're lucky enough to live on a boat and want to share.

 

But it has to be with someone with loads of boating experience or someone who is prepared to spend at least a day with us being tutored.

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