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welshmike

Anyone in London fancy becoming a lock keeper?

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http://www.waterscape.com/features-and-articles/news/3000/lock-keeper-roles-opened-up-to-londoners#

 

Lock keeper roles opened up to Londoners

28th Feb 2011

 

British Waterways is inviting people to apply to become volunteer lock keepers on their local London canal.

 

British Waterways will be holding guided walks on Thursday 3 and Friday 4 March so that potential volunteers can come along and find out more about this unique opportunity.

 

Volunteers could be working at a selection of locks including the popular Thames Lock in Brentford, the historic locks on the Hanwell Lock flight and the locks on the Hertford Union Canal.

 

Over the past few months, British Waterways has been inviting potential volunteers from all over the country to find out more about the role of a volunteer lock keeper and now it’s the turn of those living in the capital.

 

The ideal volunteer lock keeper will have an interest in the waterways, enjoy meeting people and like the sound of spending time outdoors in beautiful surroundings. They will be working from March until October and will ideally be able to offer at least one day a week, though this is flexible.

 

No prior experience is necessary as all successful applicants will receive full induction, training and a uniform to equip them for their new role as ‘the face of the waterway’. The key attributes are enthusiasm and a willingness to learn.

 

Guided walks will take place at the following locations:

 

Thursday 3 March at 10am at Brentford Thames lock

Friday 4 at 10am on the Hanwell Lock Flight

Friday 4 at 2pm on the Hertford Union Canal

For more information and to apply contact Sarah French in British Waterways’ volunteering team on 01827 252097 or email volunteer@britishwaterways.co.uk.

 

Further information on all volunteering opportunities within British Waterways can be found at waterscape.com.

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I am slightly surprised/annoyed they haven't arranged any weekend/evening meetings, unless they only want people for Mon-Fri 9-5. Seems a bit of a shame...

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http://www.waterscape.com/features-and-articles/news/3000/lock-keeper-roles-opened-up-to-londoners#

 

Lock keeper roles opened up to Londoners

28th Feb 2011

 

British Waterways is inviting people to apply to become volunteer lock keepers on their local London canal.

 

British Waterways will be holding guided walks on Thursday 3 and Friday 4 March so that potential volunteers can come along and find out more about this unique opportunity.

 

Volunteers could be working at a selection of locks including the popular Thames Lock in Brentford, the historic locks on the Hanwell Lock flight and the locks on the Hertford Union Canal.

 

Over the past few months, British Waterways has been inviting potential volunteers from all over the country to find out more about the role of a volunteer lock keeper and now it’s the turn of those living in the capital.

 

The ideal volunteer lock keeper will have an interest in the waterways, enjoy meeting people and like the sound of spending time outdoors in beautiful surroundings. They will be working from March until October and will ideally be able to offer at least one day a week, though this is flexible.

 

No prior experience is necessary as all successful applicants will receive full induction, training and a uniform to equip them for their new role as ‘the face of the waterway’. The key attributes are enthusiasm and a willingness to learn.

 

Guided walks will take place at the following locations:

 

Thursday 3 March at 10am at Brentford Thames lock

Friday 4 at 10am on the Hanwell Lock Flight

Friday 4 at 2pm on the Hertford Union Canal

For more information and to apply contact Sarah French in British Waterways’ volunteering team on 01827 252097 or email volunteer@britishwaterways.co.uk.

 

Further information on all volunteering opportunities within British Waterways can be found at waterscape.com.

Appears a good idea.especially as some people tend to leave locks open,I would off done a bit of locking if I was in the London area,it only helps and is sometimes appreciated if another person helps out at locks not to mention the victoria park one if your a single boater and have to whizz round whilts the other gate re-opens.could make life a bit more nicer doing camden as a solo boater with all the tourist around,and be a proper example to novice boaters...lead by example and all that.

  • Greenie 1

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You can volunteer on the K&A too if you so wish

 

British Waterways is inviting people to apply for a unique opportunity that will see them carry out an iconic and colourful role on their local canal.

 

For the first time British Waterways is recruiting local people to be Volunteer Lock Keepers, and will be holding guided walks at various locations along the historic Kennet and Avon Canal where potential volunteers can come along and find out more about this wonderful opportunity.

 

Volunteers could be working at a selection of historic locks on the Kennet and Avon canal including such sites as the popular Caen Hill Lock Flight and the Bath Flight, or the Grade II Listed locks at Bradford on Avon, Crofton, Seend and Kintbury.

 

The guided walks are taking place on:

 

Friday 4th March 10am at Bradford and 2pm at Bath

 

Friday 11th March 10am at Crofton and 2pm at Kintbury

 

Friday 18th March 10am at Devizes and 2pm at Seend

 

The ideal Volunteer Lock Keeper will have an interest in the waterways, enjoy meeting people and like the sound of spending time outdoors in beautiful surroundings. They will be working from March until October and will ideally be able to offer at least one day a week, though this is flexible. No prior experience is necessary – successful applicants will receive full induction, training and a uniform to equip them for their new role as ‘the face of the waterway’. The key attributes are enthusiasm and a willingness to learn.

 

Lock Keepers have been a fixture on the canal for hundreds of years. While some of the duties remain the same, today’s lock keepers will not have as difficult a time as their early predecessors. Lock Keepers in the past had to haul the heavy lock gates open by hand, defend themselves against river pirates and fight off toll thieves. Today the role of the modern-day Volunteer Lock Keeper is to provide a polite and friendly service to waterway visitors, assisting boaters through the locks and maintaining the lock area. It’s a chance for people who are passionate about their local community to make a real difference to the experience of waterway visitors, from boaters and ramblers to families feeding the ducks.

 

Volunteering is an important aspect of British Waterways’ plans in England and Wales to move management of the nation’s canals and rivers out of state control and into a new ‘national trust’ for the waterways. This exciting new charity, which is targeted to be up and running by April 2012, will attract new investment and give local people a greater role in how their waterways are run – including the opportunity to get involved in a growing number of volunteer opportunities.

 

BW’s Waterway Manager for the Kennet and Avon Canal, Mark Stephens, said: “This is an exciting opportunity and we are expecting there to be a lot of interest. The role of a lock keeper is arguably the most iconic and colourful role on the waterway and by opening it out to volunteers we’re hoping to tap into the great wealth of knowledge and passion that we know local people have for their canal.”

 

For more information and to apply to become a volunteer lock keeper please contact Sarah French in British Waterways’ volunteering team on 01827 252097or e-mail volunteer@britishwaterways.co.uk. Further information on all volunteering opportunities within British Waterways can be found on www.britishwaterways.co.uk/volunteer.

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What!!! Lock-keepers on Hanwell Flight!!! What is the point of that? And the Hertford Union three? Brentford, yes. It is tidal and needs some good local knowledge, but why on the regular locks?

 

Some people play rugby, some people run marathons. I like nothing more than spending two hours and twenty minutes single-handing up The Thick of Hanwell. I do not want any assistance please!

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What!!! Lock-keepers on Hanwell Flight!!! What is the point of that? And the Hertford Union three? Brentford, yes. It is tidal and needs some good local knowledge, but why on the regular locks?

 

Some people play rugby, some people run marathons. I like nothing more than spending two hours and twenty minutes single-handing up The Thick of Hanwell. I do not want any assistance please!

 

Nor I, on that or any other flight (with certain given exceptions such as Brentford)) especially from someone who has had a couple of hours training and thinks he knows everything about it, and reckons he understands better than I do just how my boat behaves in the locks.

 

Once when I was heading up the Southern Stratford there was a volunteer lock-keeper - complete with a Captain's hat - helping everybody up the flight. He knew better than everyone around him, and wouldn't listen to anyone else, and as a result he managed to get so many boats into one short pound that it was impossible to manoeuvre them past each other. It was like trying to play a game of Solitaire without having removed the first peg! Eventually he had to admit defeat and take the last boat (which was us) backwards back down the lock that he had just insisted we must come up through, so as to create some spare space in the pound.

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Nor I, on that or any other flight (with certain given exceptions such as Brentford)) especially from someone who has had a couple of hours training and thinks he knows everything about it, and reckons he understands better than I do just how my boat behaves in the locks.

 

Once when I was heading up the Southern Stratford there was a volunteer lock-keeper - complete with a Captain's hat - helping everybody up the flight. He knew better than everyone around him, and wouldn't listen to anyone else, and as a result he managed to get so many boats into one short pound that it was impossible to manoeuvre them past each other. It was like trying to play a game of Solitaire without having removed the first peg! Eventually he had to admit defeat and take the last boat (which was us) backwards back down the lock that he had just insisted we must come up through, so as to create some spare space in the pound.

I wonder if these volunteers will have insurance in case they cause an incident that ends badly

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You can volunteer on the K&A too if you so wish

 

British Waterways is inviting people to apply for a unique opportunity that will see them carry out an iconic and colourful role on their local canal.

 

For the first time British Waterways is recruiting local people to be Volunteer Lock Keepers, and will be holding guided walks at various locations along the historic Kennet and Avon Canal where potential volunteers can come along and find out more about this wonderful opportunity.

 

Volunteers could be working at a selection of historic locks on the Kennet and Avon canal including such sites as the popular Caen Hill Lock Flight and the Bath Flight, or the Grade II Listed locks at Bradford on Avon, Crofton, Seend and Kintbury.

 

The guided walks are taking place on:

 

Friday 4th March 10am at Bradford and 2pm at Bath

 

Friday 11th March 10am at Crofton and 2pm at Kintbury

 

Friday 18th March 10am at Devizes and 2pm at Seend

 

The ideal Volunteer Lock Keeper will have an interest in the waterways, enjoy meeting people and like the sound of spending time outdoors in beautiful surroundings. They will be working from March until October and will ideally be able to offer at least one day a week, though this is flexible. No prior experience is necessary – successful applicants will receive full induction, training and a uniform to equip them for their new role as ‘the face of the waterway’. The key attributes are enthusiasm and a willingness to learn.

 

Lock Keepers have been a fixture on the canal for hundreds of years. While some of the duties remain the same, today’s lock keepers will not have as difficult a time as their early predecessors. Lock Keepers in the past had to haul the heavy lock gates open by hand, defend themselves against river pirates and fight off toll thieves. Today the role of the modern-day Volunteer Lock Keeper is to provide a polite and friendly service to waterway visitors, assisting boaters through the locks and maintaining the lock area. It’s a chance for people who are passionate about their local community to make a real difference to the experience of waterway visitors, from boaters and ramblers to families feeding the ducks.

 

Volunteering is an important aspect of British Waterways’ plans in England and Wales to move management of the nation’s canals and rivers out of state control and into a new ‘national trust’ for the waterways. This exciting new charity, which is targeted to be up and running by April 2012, will attract new investment and give local people a greater role in how their waterways are run – including the opportunity to get involved in a growing number of volunteer opportunities.

 

BW’s Waterway Manager for the Kennet and Avon Canal, Mark Stephens, said: “This is an exciting opportunity and we are expecting there to be a lot of interest. The role of a lock keeper is arguably the most iconic and colourful role on the waterway and by opening it out to volunteers we’re hoping to tap into the great wealth of knowledge and passion that we know local people have for their canal.”

 

For more information and to apply to become a volunteer lock keeper please contact Sarah French in British Waterways’ volunteering team on 01827 252097or e-mail volunteer@britishwaterways.co.uk. Further information on all volunteering opportunities within British Waterways can be found on www.britishwaterways.co.uk/volunteer.

 

 

Noticed that to for the K & A. BW don't mention where to exactly meet for each of the walks as am curious to know how this would work. Taking nothing away from all the volunteers you do and have done such excellent work on the canals over the years, are BW trying to get a 'free' workforce to do their job? There has been a very good lock keeper at the bottom end of the K & A for many years and would dread to think that he would be replaced.

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What!!! Lock-keepers on Hanwell Flight!!! What is the point of that? And the Hertford Union three? Brentford, yes. It is tidal and needs some good local knowledge, but why on the regular locks?

 

Some people play rugby, some people run marathons. I like nothing more than spending two hours and twenty minutes single-handing up The Thick of Hanwell. I do not want any assistance please!

 

 

Nor I, on that or any other flight (with certain given exceptions such as Brentford)) especially from someone who has had a couple of hours training and thinks he knows everything about it, and reckons he understands better than I do just how my boat behaves in the locks.

 

Once when I was heading up the Southern Stratford there was a volunteer lock-keeper - complete with a Captain's hat - helping everybody up the flight. He knew better than everyone around him, and wouldn't listen to anyone else, and as a result he managed to get so many boats into one short pound that it was impossible to manoeuvre them past each other. It was like trying to play a game of Solitaire without having removed the first peg! Eventually he had to admit defeat and take the last boat (which was us) backwards back down the lock that he had just insisted we must come up through, so as to create some spare space in the pound.

 

You are making te assumption that the role is largely about helping boats through locks.

 

Is it not possible that some of it is about actually just keeping a watching brief, and ensuring that pounds stay full enough for navigation ?

 

Having on our last two passages arrived at Ducketts to find a near empty pound between the top two locks, I'd certainly not complain if a volunteer had been along a few hours earlier and arranged to put the water back.

 

(Maybe a volunteer could even do something towards stopping the water going missing in the first place ?).

 

On the tidal locks I'm a bit more worried, though..... "Sorry sir, a passage will not be possible today - our volunteer was a no show......."

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What!!! Lock-keepers on Hanwell Flight!!! What is the point of that? And the Hertford Union three? Brentford, yes. It is tidal and needs some good local knowledge, but why on the regular locks?

 

My guess would be that BW know they only really need people on certain locks but would rather have a large pool of volunteers(to cover for those that don't turn up) - obviously to keep these folk interested you need to give them something to do.

 

Once they are up to speed on their "own locks" it would be easier to move them to wherever you want them.

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My guess would be that BW know they only really need people on certain locks but would rather have a large pool of volunteers(to cover for those that don't turn up) - obviously to keep these folk interested you need to give them something to do.

 

Once they are up to speed on their "own locks" it would be easier to move them to wherever you want them.

A bit like the lock keepers who WORK between Foxton and Watford staircases

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I am slightly surprised/annoyed they haven't arranged any weekend/evening meetings, unless they only want people for Mon-Fri 9-5. Seems a bit of a shame...

The staff that are doing the walks don't work weekends/ evenings.

Sue

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The staff that are doing the walks don't work weekends/ evenings.

Sue

 

I can imagine. Although in most organisations that use volunteers (both voluntary and statutory sectors) have to arrange for staff to work evenings and weekends to provide volunteer training and support. I know BW do have some staff, working in their volunteering support team, who will work out of hours.

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What!!! Lock-keepers on Hanwell Flight!!! What is the point of that? And the Hertford Union three? Brentford, yes. It is tidal and needs some good local knowledge, but why on the regular locks?

 

Some people play rugby, some people run marathons. I like nothing more than spending two hours and twenty minutes single-handing up The Thick of Hanwell. I do not want any assistance please!

It is only in comparatively recent times that there has not been a permanent Lock Keeper, resident on the Hanwell flight. For some while it was John (knuckles) Dakin, amd before that I believe it was his father Ken Dakin, he certainly lived in the Lock Keepers house half way down the flight.

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Nor I, on that or any other flight (with certain given exceptions such as Brentford)) especially from someone who has had a couple of hours training and thinks he knows everything about it, and reckons he understands better than I do just how my boat behaves in the locks.

 

Once when I was heading up the Southern Stratford there was a volunteer lock-keeper - complete with a Captain's hat - helping everybody up the flight. He knew better than everyone around him, and wouldn't listen to anyone else, and as a result he managed to get so many boats into one short pound that it was impossible to manoeuvre them past each other. It was like trying to play a game of Solitaire without having removed the first peg! Eventually he had to admit defeat and take the last boat (which was us) backwards back down the lock that he had just insisted we must come up through, so as to create some spare space in the pound.

 

We had one like that at Hurleston. As Linda wasn't on it was idiot time with some 2hr clown telling us to get in the (shortest) pound with the boat in front. The wife ignored him and set the locks correctly. Meanwhile, under his care the boat in the top pound got rammed by the one coming down as the expert had no clue as to how they passed. We have had similar 'experts' at Grindley where we one day noticed the old keeper (now a BW general purpose worker) having hysterics at that days temp. Unfortunately its going to get worse.

 

(My wifes finest was when one teenaged expert threatened to exclude her from his locks for not doing as he said and not let some water down so we didn't ground on the sill. That lock even has a mark that locks must be filled too to prevent this happening but our man in charge knew better!)

Edited by Tiny

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It is only in comparatively recent times that there has not been a permanent Lock Keeper, resident on the Hanwell flight. For some while it was John (knuckles) Dakin, amd before that I believe it was his father Ken Dakin, he certainly lived in the Lock Keepers house half way down the flight.

 

...and a few years ago there was a youg girl that did the job - can't remember her name though.

 

Tim

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Looking at the locks that they've chosen on the K&A, I'd say this is much more about having a presence at places that there are lots of non-boating visitors that can be approached to join the trust (K&A or new BW).

 

To me the role will be to strut about in a uniform, chat to visitors to the locks, hand out leaflets and persuade people to sign up on the spot.

 

If this role was about looking after the lock and assisting boats through it why have they chosen benign locks such as Kintbury and left off right b------s like Woolhampton, Monkey Marsh, Garston?

  • Greenie 1

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Looking at the locks that they've chosen on the K&A, I'd say this is much more about having a presence at places that there are lots of non-boating visitors that can be approached to join the trust (K&A or new BW).

 

To me the role will be to strut about in a uniform, chat to visitors to the locks, hand out leaflets and persuade people to sign up on the spot.

 

If this role was about looking after the lock and assisting boats through it why have they chosen benign locks such as Kintbury and left off right b------s like Woolhampton, Monkey Marsh, Garston?

 

Am genuinly interested in what they are intending to do. Don't knock the volunteers.

 

Emailed volunteer@britishwaterays.co.uk last evening at 19:23 to ask where in Bath they were meeting for the walk. Fairly instant out of office reply came back, no probs.

 

This am got an email from Sarah French, Education & Volunteer Administrators, Cambrian House, Birmingham at 11:50 am saying 'Leave it with me and I will find out definite location. Hope to get back to you by the end of the day. Cheers, Sarah'. OK, no issue here, but at the time of writing no further email has been received.

 

Stand to be corrected, but if BW are asking for volunteers and organising a meeting/walk on a specific time and place, is it unreasonable to think that they know where they are to be for the meeting/walk that they know where they are holding it? Maybe I am wrong, but when I organise a meeting I tell people where it is, time etc.

 

Will keep the forum updated.

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Am genuinly interested in what they are intending to do. Don't knock the volunteers.

 

Emailed volunteer@britishwaterays.co.uk last evening at 19:23 to ask where in Bath they were meeting for the walk. Fairly instant out of office reply came back, no probs.

 

This am got an email from Sarah French, Education & Volunteer Administrators, Cambrian House, Birmingham at 11:50 am saying 'Leave it with me and I will find out definite location. Hope to get back to you by the end of the day. Cheers, Sarah'. OK, no issue here, but at the time of writing no further email has been received.

 

Stand to be corrected, but if BW are asking for volunteers and organising a meeting/walk on a specific time and place, is it unreasonable to think that they know where they are to be for the meeting/walk that they know where they are holding it? Maybe I am wrong, but when I organise a meeting I tell people where it is, time etc.

 

Will keep the forum updated.

Never mind you will get a uniform :wacko:

Sue

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The staff that are doing the walks don't work weekends/ evenings.

Sue

Unless BW revise their supervisory arrangements, this will never work.

 

Volunteers very often have full-time or part-time paid jobs. They need to get hold of managers / roster clerks etc. in their own time, not in work time. The simplest way of arranging this is to ensure that their managers and roster clerks are volunteers too, and willing to answer queries in the evenings and at weekends.

 

I really don't think BW know what they're getting themselves into here.

 

The name of the game is to make volunteering as easy as it possibly can be. So, you can only work Saturdays? That's fine. Tuesday afternoons? Ok then.

Edited by sociable_hermit

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