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alan_fincher

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alan_fincher last won the day on February 17

alan_fincher had the most liked content!

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About alan_fincher

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hertfordshire
  • Interests
    Building a very small fleet of ex working boats!

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Retired (from Computing)
  • Boat Name
    "Sickle" & "Flamingo" (both built 1936, by W.J. Yarwood and Sons)
  • Boat Location
    Grand Union (Southern)

Contact Methods

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  • Website URL
    http://sickleandflamingo.blogspot.co.uk/

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40,435 profile views
  1. Removing Ballast

    I'm no expert but I would have thought overplating in 8mm "challenging" to say the very least. I would have thought trying to attach that thickness adequately to existing thinner bottoms might be impractical, but I guess we probably need the views of people with hands on experience of this type of work
  2. Removing Ballast

    Don't understand that. If it is 6mm currently, it can't end up less than 10mm, as 4mm overplate would surely be a minimum. I think you need to recheck with surveyor what he would actually be recommending. If you take out enough ballast to cope with a new bottom you don't know if you'll actually be needing in 6 years, surely you will then spend at least 6 years with a potentially unstable poorly handling boat. This would seem a very odd thing to do. You really only should adjust the ballast at such time as the boat might actually be made heavier?
  3. Gas Locker Lock

    Whilst I have also heard this position, I can't imagine that there is a fre engine anywhere in the country that doesn't carry equipment that would allow any lock to be removed in seconds. I think the issue is more about people other than the fire brigade being able to gain very rapid access. Personally I would not lock a gas locker lid, but I know many people do. I think it pales into insignificance though, compared to those who live and sleep aboard without unlocking both ends of their cabin. Many of our local live aboards keep one end externally locked with a padlock, cutting off an escape route that could make the difference between life or death. (Or have so much junk and plants in front of the doors that they have no chance of getting through them even if unlocked.)
  4. Removing Ballast

    Are you talking about reducing the amount the boat draws with the extra steel, or the actual practicalities of rebottoming a boat that has ballast piled on the current baseplate? I would say that the norm for most "modern" boats is to overplate, rather than to cut old bottoms out and replace. It is a very much bigger job to replace than overplate, (otherwise it would always be done that way), and clearly to do that you couldn't have bricks cascading down on you as you cut the old bottoms out. However if overplating, I can't see the bottom increasing from 6mm to just 8mm - you wouldn't realistically overplate in less than 4mm, and the problem with 4mm is that once that starts to erode or pit, yuou then effectively quickly have less than this so called insurable minimum. I would think overplating in 5mm or 6mm makes more sense, so that is actually what you need to allow for. We don't know how many bricks you have, so impossible to say how many ideally would need removing. It is not however hard to estimatethe weight of an extra layer of 5mm or 6mm of steel added to your boats baseplate.
  5. Fradley is full

    So who are you paying the fiver to, and how is it collected. (As you can see I have not come across such an arrangement).
  6. Then and Now

    My attempts at a "then and now" on a recent trip out with "Sickle". The interval between old and new photos is about 45 years. Details in blog post here.
  7. Progress on dock

    I think it was being (or is about to be?) used for some function where it was (or will be?) visited by various people from Richard Parry downwards. Perhaps this is only temporary in connection with that? I agree with Leo that the fenders need rehanging!
  8. Anyone got any experience with this fridge??

    Even if you could make it work it will take typically at least four times as much out of your battery bank as a compressor fridge might. (It could be even worse if the thermostat control doesn't operate on 12 volts - on many absorption 3-way fridges the 12v is not controlled). IMO three-way fridges are only viable on a canal boat if either..... 1) You run them on gas 2) You run them on 240V, but strictly only when connected to a landline.
  9. Not seen for a while

    An ideal brief for designing a boat for the British canals, then!
  10. Not seen for a while

    I was referring to the second picture Ray posted
  11. Not seen for a while

    Is the one with flowers on the one that used to have a large sign on saying "generator run late at night" or something similar, or is it a different one?
  12. Fun in Gosty Hill tunnel

    Or sometimes Gorsty Hill, and I'm sure I have seen at least one old picture of one of the tunnel mouths with Costy Hill on it. I think Gosty is the most normal now.
  13. Progress on dock

    Having seen the paint at point blank range, I just marvel at the skills of the painter. You literally can't see any brush strokes in it - it is absolutely smooth (and highly shiny!). Hard to believe it's covering wood not steel. The painter is realistic that it is only as good as what lies underneath, which on much of it is outside his control. Apparently overpainting (I think) the front of the cabin which was thought to be in good condition then produced blisters. Investigation revealed that varnish had previously been used as a primer, (yes honestly!), and had been fine until the new paint somehow reacted with it. For the moment it looks stunning though.
  14. Thoughts on this tug

    It looks a very nice boat, but that price seems completely unjustifiable to me, given its age. If it sells at anything near that, somebody must want it very badly indeed.
  15. Progress on dock

    We have been highly privileged to get a sneak tour of Progress whilst an absolutely superb paint job with full decoration and sign writing was being completed in the paint dock at High House Wharf. She looks absolutely superb. I would have loved to get photos, but we missed her departure for Stoke Bruerne this morning by minutes, apparently. It's possible she is already back there - if someone can get an image, it would be great to see it posted. The painter and signwriter has done a stunning job.
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