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Ray T

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Ray T last won the day on September 2 2016

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  1. As regards to "Who goes first" in the heyday of canal carrying this issue was often settled with the fist, belt or windlass and that included the women who' d give as much if not better than the men. Mike has said he's often seen men "flattened" by women.
  2. On a previous thread I had a man refuse to move up as he had just set his satellite dish up. I'm afraid what I call "motorway manners" are invading the cut.
  3. Answering the last question regards being windy. There is really no choice but to apply a little more throttle when passing other boats. On the rare ocassion I have been shouted at for going too fast, if I am being blown towards the shouter I just say "The choice I have is going slowly and possibly hitting you or going at this speed and having steerage." If the wind is blowing the other way I just smile and carry on. As you say offshore and narrow boating are two totally different consepts both enjoyable in their own way. At least you have enjoyed standing beneath a cold shower tearing up £20 pound notes! Also in life I have a saying "Better to be a has been than a never was."
  4. We're in Adnams land at the moment but I have never developed a taste for beer. A visit to their wine shop will suffice. No canals here just some wide water bits and rivers.
  5. Nor mine. If had come up with loads of "spam" I wouldn't have copied the link.
  6. Sorry it is late:
  7. This topic has to be "History" by now. http://www.dailyfeed.co.uk/2017/07/11-things-didnt-know-rosie-jim/ Anyone have plans to build an Anderson Shelter please?
  8. Archie, I find this a little more difficult with the "Claw" now fitted. I find I have to hold the spindle then pull the windlass off the spindle. I have tried knocking off the claw but an not always successful and on occasions looks like I am having a hissy fit belting the gear with my windlass.
  9. Like this.
  10. 387,951. Sluice valves. BENCE, E. H., Municipal Engineering Works, Langley Green, Birmingham, HAM, P. S., 70, Victoria Street, London, and MORGAN, E. I., 8, Wolverhampton Road, Sedgley, Birmingham. Aug. 24, 1932, No. 23694. [Class 68 (ii).] A sluice valve is operated by screw gearing of such a pitch that the valve, when raised and released, will descend by its own weight. The Figure shows a gearing for raising a flat sliding valve, not shown, at the lower end of a non-revolving rod 14. It comprises a gear case 19, 20, containing bevel wheels 23, 24 rotatable so that the nut 35 raises the rod 14. When raised, it is retained by pawls 33a, 33b engaging with ratchet wheels 30, 31 ; these may be released by overturning a link 34, and the valve then descends. The stop 37 is fitted with a buffer 38, or may function as a dashpot. In a modification, the rod 14 is keyed to the wheel 23, and rotates in a nut at the upper end of a tube attached to the valve rod. Buffers are fitted at the lower edge of valve ; they may be removed to enable the valve to be removed.
  11. Inside Ham Baker gear: Not aimed at anyone on here but why do many folks think this gear is hydraulic? Rhetorical question I suppose. Also if "you" are told these weren't designed to "drop." 387,951. Sluice valves. BENCE, E. H., Municipal Engineering Works, Langley Green, Birmingham, HAM, P. S., 70, Victoria Street, London, and MORGAN, E. I., 8, Wolverhampton Road, Sedgley, Birmingham. Aug. 24, 1932, No. 23694. [Class 68 (ii).] A sluice valve is operated by screw gearing of such a pitch that the valve, when raised and released, will descend by its own weight. The Figure shows a gearing for raising a flat sliding valve, not shown, at the lower end of a non-revolving rod 14. It comprises a gear case 19, 20, containing bevel wheels 23, 24 rotatable so that the nut 35 raises the rod 14. When raised, it is retained by pawls 33a, 33b engaging with ratchet wheels 30, 31 ; these may be released by overturning a link 34, and the valve then descends. The stop 37 is fitted with a buffer 38, or may function as a dashpot. In a modification, the rod 14 is keyed to the wheel 23, and rotates in a nut at the upper end of a tube attached to the valve rod. Buffers are fitted at the lower edge of valve ; they may be removed to enable the valve to be removed. Whether with age this may now be a different matter.
  12. From ASAP? https://www.asap-supplies.com/asapsearch/sub-category/engine-+-gearbox-controls-+-spares?q=throttle
  13. Quite common practice to rig a plank in this fashion. Picture from A Canal People, Longdon / Rolt.
  14. Get yourself an "Atherston Wedge."
  15. Always 11am on our boat! Following Naval tradition. THE SUN'S OVER THE YARDARM The expression is believed to have originated in the north Atlantic where the sun would rise above the upper mast spars (yards) of square sailed ships around 11am. This coincided with the forenoon ‘stand easy’ when officers would go below and enjoy their first rum tot of the day. Eventually the phrase was adopted universally as meaning it is a suitable time to have an alcoholic beverage. Or: SUN IS OVER THE YARDARM - "(time for happy hour to begin). This expression is thought to have its origins in an officers' custom aboard ships sailing in the north Atlantic. In those latitudes, the sun would rise above the upper yards - the horizontal spars mounted on the masts, from which squaresails were hung - around 11 a.m. Since this coincided with the forenoon 'stand easy,' officers would take advantage of the break to go below for their first tot of spirits for the day. The expression washed ashore where the sun appears over the figurative yardarm a bit later in the day, generally after 5 p.m., and the end of the workday." From "When a Loose Cannon Flogs a Dead Horse There's the Devil to Pay: Seafaring Words in Everyday Speech" by Olivia A. Isil (International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press, McGraw-Hill, 1996) I'll stick with the first interpretation.